Up the workers…

The Royal Academy of Arts is now showcasing “Revolution: Russian Art 1917–1932”. While this at first seems a fairly innocuous retrospective, when you re-consider those dates and the consequences of that title the reflection is one of a momentous period of change and upheaval. While that timeline could probably be dragged pre 1917 and post 1932, those dates do somehow capture that period of significance.

Artwork that initially resembled the appeal of 19th century railway posters, bold colours, striking iconography, transcends into evocations of the tumultuous history of the period. Far-reaching and shattering in its consequences.

Curiously some of the work seems to go beyond the boundaries of time and space. Look at Alexander Deineka’s Textile Workers, 1927. They resemble robots, blank and automated, that conjure visions of the mindlessness of the coming late 21st century rather than a historic period piece.

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Deineka’s “Textile Workers”

Or Kazmir Malevich, ‘Peasants’, c.1930, a kaleidoscope of colours and the inhumanity of those staring figures with no facial features, breathtakingly prescient.

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Malevich’s “Peasants”

And if you are able to get to the exhibition and it fascinates, then follow that up later this year with the Tate’s Red Star over Russia. Up the peasants, up the workers!

Capsize!

Canoeist on his own
River Wye, England/Wales

Somehow one thinks of solitude as being a state that one consents to enter into. The quiet time for reflection, or the need to be alone for some introspection. But sometimes life just throws itself around you and you find yourself in a situation that would be so much better if you were not alone or in Solitude.

Just a note for sensitive souls: Other paddlers did help out and all was well.

Hand-Built DB’s 4 GT

Aston Martin’s iconic model the DB4 is over 50 years old, but a new version of it is now to be hand-built at its original site in Newport Pagnell, England.

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Aston Martin, Newport Pagnell, Bucks, England

Currently the site restores Aston Martin Cars, so this will be returning the hand-built craftsmanship that has been missing for many years, albeit only 25 new cars.

But does the fact that this is a pastiche mean there is less Craft involved? Probably not, and its charming to see that hand built cars can actually still be produced in this over-mechanised world.

Graffiti clean-up?

A bit like cycle lanes views on graffiti generate contradictory arguments. Personally I appreciate graffiti, often find it challenging, and appreciate the medium as being immediate and local. It can often be thoughtful, and I like the opportunity it provides to give a glimpse of another perspective, views from the urban artist.

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Hipster wall art Shoreditch

Oftentimes I find the colourful displays an antidote to the cold bare urban concrete environment. Indeed the inspired good natured graffiti can transform what would otherwise be an uninspired dreary experience, such as walking through an underpass, into a less threatening, even pleasant journey. While I’d prefer not to have gang tags or offensive stuff scrawled on the walls, I don’t think there is any need to blatantly remove everything that is up there.

I’m not sure whether I realised that people tagged their own work. After reading  Christana’s blog, it seems they do. Somehow it seems curious why someone should tag their work. I thought they preferred anonymity and from the viewer it was part of the medium about recognising the work.

By its nature it is transitory. I reckon you should just enjoy it while it is there. I think the idea of re-siting graffiti into art galleries is irony at its best. Once it is gone, well then, you have a shared experience with all other local people and visitors who have seen it.

 

 

I do like to be beside the Seaside

At the moment I have a bit of a crush on these seascapes from Sally-Anne Adams.

 

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Sailing Boats, North Norfolk Coast 

 

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Beach Huts, Wells-Next-Sea, Norfolk.

 

I can feel and hear the sea when I gaze at these images. Almost smell the salt of the sea and sense the shifting clouds re-creating shapes and memories. Where’s you favourite seascape? Never yet been to the sea – in for a treat when you do.

Blogging ‘eck

I’m keen to develop the discipline of regular writing, and a blog allows that in bite-sized pieces which suits me and my short-attention span! And yes I use exclamation marks much too often.

I try and write about things that interest me. My eclectic tastes include art, architecture and writing, as well as sports such as cycling, running and kayaking with other stuff just thrown in, a bit like life itself.

Oh and I moved from Blogger (remember that?), this time last year, so used the xml export/import with no problems. So this year thought I’d try and learn a bit more about blogging and get a bit more dynamic.